How to Start Eating Seasonally

Vegan Caesar Salad

Eating with the seasons isn’t a new idea of course—it’s what humans have been doing since our hunter-gatherer days. With the arrival of modern supermarkets, the requirement to eat whatever was growing or available at the moment waned. Now we can eat fresh peas and raspberries year ‘round, and the terms “winter” squash or “summer” squash hold little seasonal meaning when it can be purchased in the opposing season, but that doesn’t mean that seasonal eating is a pointless exercise.

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Meal Prepping for Real Life

Sweet Potato Chili

If you’re on social media or the internet much at all, you’ve likely seen the photos of multiple, matching meals in little boxes all lined up on the counter. These images are examples of “meal prepping,” a cooking and eating style that has made the jump from being a trend among fitness fanatics to a popular time-saving tool for us average Joes and Janes. I see the appeal of these photos—such order, symmetry and colorful, considered composition! What I don’t see is the appeal of this style of eating as a weekly practice year-round. Let’s explore this trend and see if we can pull any useful tips from it that might benefit those who cook and eat in a more typical fashion.

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Surviving as a Couple When Your Eating Plans Don’t Match

Roasted Cauliflower Steaks

One of my most recent posts was about the power of having (and being) a partner when pursuing health goals. Yes, having to “go it alone” on a weight loss plan or healthy lifestyle routine can be a drag, but what might be worse is dealing with a spouse or significant other who doesn’t share your healthy eating plan. Why does this seem to be such a hot-button issue, and what can we do to tame the turmoil that so often occurs in this scenario? Here are some things I’ve learned from my own experience with this problem (and yes, we are still happily married!), and a few tips that might help you, too.

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Find and Be a Healthy-Living Partner

Coconut Chicken and Sweet Potato Stew

The year is still young, which means those healthy-living resolutions might still be in play—and if so, good for you! In fact, maybe your significant other, roommate, spouse or best friend is also in pursuit of a health goal this year. We’ve written about how to start making a change to your lifestyle and ways to stick to your healthy routine before, but as I reread that post I realized that I did not include finding a health “buddy.” It’s not crucial, but it helps. Going it alone can be a drag.

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Why Your Crash Diet Is a Crash-and-Burn Setup

Beet, Orange and Apple Salad

If you’re determined to drop some weight RIGHT NOW then you might be thinking that a crash diet is your best bet. Although there is no medical definition of a “crash” diet, most folks equate them with rapid weight loss due to extreme caloric restriction. Sometimes rapid weight loss diets are physician supervised and tightly controlled and undertaken for health reasons that require quick weight loss progress. More often though, extreme diets are a go-it-alone process, and that’s when things can go off track and head into dangerous territory; here are a few reasons why…

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New Year, New You?

The featured photo of the article.

According to surveys, 41% of Americans usually make New Year’s resolutions, and roughly 21% of those involve eating more healthfully and losing weight, while working out more often is a resolution of about 5% of people. Clearly, improving oneself is a goal—and not inherently a bad thing. In fact, those who set goals are more likely to achieve them—even if it takes multiple attempts. I have no problem with goal setting; it’s a great tool. I do, however, have a problem with the magazine cover line “new year, new you.”

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That Party Punch Likely Packs a Caloric Punch, Too

The featured photo of the article.

I’m one of those people who throw an annual holiday party, and every year I make a big bowl (okay, more like 2-3 bowls) of punch for my guests. I serve grown-up punch: its festive appearance (complete with fancy ice ring) belies its potency. People look forward to it because punch is one of those things that just screams “party.” Plus, pretty much nobody else I know makes punch.

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Holidays and Health: Eating Concerns of the Elderly

The featured photo of the article.

From special feasts to parties to family togetherness and comfy stay-in-your-jammies-and-watch-the-snow-fall day, there’s lots to enjoy and be thankful for at holiday time. Sometimes we get pretty wrapped up in our own lives and preparations for the holidays, but this is an important time to check in with the older people in our lives. Why? Well, for many elderly people, the holidays don’t seem so fun and festive anymore. Of course, there are a variety of reasons why, many of which have nothing to do nutrition. But with food being such a central part of the holidays, I think it makes sense to give the elderly a little extra attention in the nutrition and eating department. If you don’t have an older person in your family to help care for, there’s a good chance that you do have an elderly neighbor, friend or even acquaintance you see regularly in your community.

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