Posts By: kbroihier

That Party Punch Likely Packs a Caloric Punch, Too

by in Healthy Holidays, Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

I’m one of those people who throw an annual holiday party, and every year I make a big bowl (okay, more like 2-3 bowls) of punch for my guests. I serve grown-up punch: its festive appearance (complete with fancy ice ring) belies its potency. People look forward to it because punch is one of those things that just screams “party.” Plus, pretty much nobody else I know makes punch.

That Party Punch Likely Packs a Caloric Punch, Too

Holidays and Health: Eating Concerns of the Elderly

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

From special feasts to parties to family togetherness and comfy stay-in-your-jammies-and-watch-the-snow-fall day, there’s lots to enjoy and be thankful for at holiday time. Sometimes we get pretty wrapped up in our own lives and preparations for the holidays, but this is an important time to check in with the older people in our lives. Why? Well, for many elderly people, the holidays don’t seem so fun and festive anymore. Of course, there are a variety of reasons why, many of which have nothing to do nutrition. But with food being such a central part of the holidays, I think it makes sense to give the elderly a little extra attention in the nutrition and eating department. If you don’t have an older person in your family to help care for, there’s a good chance that you do have an elderly neighbor, friend or even acquaintance you see regularly in your community.

Holidays and Health: Eating Concerns of the Elderly

Cook it Slow, Keep it Safe

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

There’s no denying the convenience factor of a slow-cooked meal that just takes a few minutes of preparation, cooks all day while you’re busy living your life and then is ready when you need a hot dinner. Whether you are using the slow cooker mode on your Instant Pot or the trusty slow cooker you’ve had for years, it’s important to keep food safety in mind. After all, the food is cooking “low and slow” a long time, and then often waiting for you on the “keep warm” setting for a while—there is potential for bacteria to multiply to dangerous levels if good food safety practices are not employed. As author of a couple of slow cooker cookbooks, and having used a slow cooker since I was in college, I’ve had my share of experience with these machines.

Cook it Slow, Keep it Safe

Sodium At Home…And Away

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

A study published this year examined the diets of adults from three different geographic regions of the U.S. and found that sodium added to food outside the home was the leading source, accounting for about 70% of total sodium intake. And, although the amount varied in some subgroups of the study sample, it was still the leading contributor for all groups. (Only about 10% came from salt added at the table or during cooking at home.) This finding matches well with public health recommendations to reduce sodium intake from take-out, convenience and restaurant foods as a primary strategy to decrease sodium intake in the U.S.

Sodium At Home…And Away

Fall Back Into Your Eating Routine

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Whether you’re sad that summer is coming to a close or you’re ready to ring in autumn season with your first pumpkin-spice latte, you can’t deny that the end of summer brings with it a sort of diet reality check. I don’t mean weight loss diet; I mean your overall diet. Even if there is no “back to school” hoopla going on at your house, I’d venture to say that that September’s arrival still means a switch away from the breezy, more impromptu meal style of summer and back to the more organized meal style of fall.  

Fall Back Into Your Eating Routine

Putting the Chill on the Fresh vs. Frozen Debate

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Coming off of the summer months into full-swing harvest time, it’s easy to load our diets with fresh fruits and vegetables—and as any good dietitian will tell you, that’s a great thing! Take advantage of the ample supply; pile those plates with fresh, seasonal produce and you’ll reap plenty of vitamins, minerals, health-promoting phytonutrients and fiber as well.

Putting the Chill on the Fresh vs. Frozen Debate

Take a Hike (And Not Be Hungry)

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

A good hike on a beautiful day is one of my favorite ways to enjoy the outdoors. There’s just something about putting on those hiking boots or trail shoes and setting off for a few hours of trekking in the woods that is good for body and soul. It’s also good for working up an appetite (or at least a thirst). Even if you’re just hiking for a short while, it pays to always be prepared with food and drink. Here are a few tips for satisfying your hunger on your next hike…

Take a Hike (And Not Be Hungry)