Food, Inc. is thought provoking

My wife and I had heard snippets in the media and from friends and colleagues about the movie Food, Inc. We finally rented it and sat down to watch it. The movie is of that genre of semi-documentaries made with a clear bias and a core message to deliver (think Michael Moore).

Nonetheless, like many people we found Food, Inc. to be thought provoking. Much of what is presented is doubtless factual, and most of it is at least mildly disturbing. Although I think of myself as someone who maintains a healthy diet and lifestyle and who knows something about food and the food industry, I was surprised to learn about the makeup of the modern food industry.

Although I think of myself as someone who maintains a healthy diet and lifestyle and who knows something about food and the food industry, I was surprised to learn about the makeup of the modern food industry.

Who would have guessed that four manufacturers control over 80% of the meat industry? Or that corn and soybeans are such predominant, government subsidized crops in the U.S. that they appear directly or indirectly as ingredients in virtually every food you’ll find on today’s store shelves? Or, perhaps more insidiously, that one chemical company has a virtual monopoly on the GMO seed supply used to grow almost all of today’s soybeans?

If you’re interested in food quality and food safety for yourself, your family and your community, you may find Food, Inc. to be informative and even galvanizing. And if you’re interested in influencing how food is grown, stored, and transported throughout this great country of ours, vote with your pocketbook whenever you make food choices.

Watch the Food, Inc. trailer

John Eldredge is the Director of Brand and Business Development for Guiding Stars Licensing Company. John’s 30 years of consumer products experience — ranging from General Mills to Earth’s Best organic baby food — have made him a believer in a healthy lifestyle and good-for-you products. He has enjoyed leading the charge in bringing the Guiding Stars program to a growing number of consumers and strategic partners. But call John during lunch and you’re likely to get his voicemail. He enjoys running or Nordic skiing most days at noon.

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Jaica Kinsman
11 years ago

Great review John. Thanks for writing this!

Tricia
11 years ago

As a follow-up to this movie I recommend reading “The Omnivore’s
Dilemma” by Michael Pollan.

John D. Mathieu
10 years ago

King Corn is another informative movie that addresses our
subsidized corn industry.