Posts By: kbroihier

You Say Seaweed, I Say Sea Vegetable

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

To some of us, seaweed is just that annoying stuff that you gingerly step around when walking the beach, but for others, it’s on tonight’s dinner plate. Seaweeds, sometimes called sea vegetables, have been a traditional food in China, Japan and the Republic of Korea, and are frequently used as a salad ingredient in Indonesia and Malaysia. Other people who live close to the oceans (various European and Nordic countries) have also a history of harvesting and eating local sea vegetables. Along the northeast coast of the U.S. as well as New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, seaweed companies are growing their businesses rapidly as food manufacturers discover that the public is becoming interested in the taste as well as the potential health benefits of sea vegetables. Eating seaweed isn’t something new in the U.S. and Canada, but it is becoming more popular as people learn more about these abundant sea vegetables. Last year Maine hosted its first Seaweed Festival to help spread the word.

You Say Seaweed, I Say Sea Vegetable

Bowl Me Over

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Have you heard of “superfood bowls”? Maybe you’ve seen the many bowls full of colorful food combinations on Pinterest? “Superfood bowls” are really just artfully arranged, mini-portions of various healthy foods all collected into one bowl. Bowls are appropriate for breakfast and lunch since they are designed to be a quick and healthy option you can take with you on the fly. But a casual dinner is also the perfect time for a bowl you create at home. They are endlessly customizable, which appeals to today’s consumers, and you can find them everywhere from hipster hangouts to everyday franchise restaurants—or make your own bowl of goodness.

Bowl Me Over

Report hints at content of the 2015 US Dietary Guidelines for Americans

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

I’m just guessing here, but I bet that you probably are not interested in reading the 500+page report from the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee last week. No worries (and I don’t blame you)! The Committee (made up of 14 recognized experts in the field of nutrition and health) has been at work for the last year and a half or so, reviewing pertinent new science in order to present their Scientific Report to the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Agriculture, who are jointly responsible for revising the Dietary Guidelines. Why do they need revising? Because science changes, because the state of Americans’ health changes, and because the Dietary Guidelines form the backbone upon which rests a good deal of national nutrition policy—including those of public food and nutrition programs like school lunch.

Report hints at content of the 2015 US Dietary Guidelines for Americans

Is “healthy” comfort food an oxymoron?

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

You might think that “comfort food” and “healthy” don’t go together naturally, and that might be. After all, many of our cozy favorites are not bursting with kale or quinoa. And sometimes you simply must have Grandma’s stuffed shells—just the way Grandma made it, made with regular pasta and lots of full fat cheese. That’s okay; I get it. If that’s what you want once in a while, that’s perfectly fine—enjoy. But if you’re one of those folks whose comfort food concoctions have become less a “special food” and more of a staple in your recipe rotation—you might want to consider a few easy recipe modifications in the name of healthfulness. These three basic tweaks are easy to achieve and go a long way toward moving your edible soothers onto the “everyday acceptable” list.

Is “healthy” comfort food an oxymoron?

Taking Comfort in Food

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Does this sound familiar? You had an especially tough day at work, or broke up with your significant other, or the weather is dreary/damp/dreadful (maybe you’ve been snowed in three times in the last week?) or you’re down in the dumps for any of the other myriad reasons we all encounter, and your thoughts start turning to that specific food (or foods) that always makes you feel better…and later you stop and get that food at a restaurant or take-out joint, or purchase the required ingredients on your way home. Soon you’re “self-medicating” with the comfort food of your choice (and perhaps snuggling in your favorite comfy jammies for an extra measure of soothing). It’s okay: most of us have been there too

Taking Comfort in Food

Bone Broth Brouhaha

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

The swirl of publicity surrounding this simple broth is astounding. If one believes the proponents, daily bone broth consumption can prevent or cure all manner of ills, from aiding in digestion to repairing and strengthening bones to giving a glow to skin and a gloss to hair—and that’s just a partial list of the purported benefits. So does this old-fashioned food live up to the hype, or is the bone broth trend a load of bunk? Let’s take a look…

Bone Broth Brouhaha

Using Mindfulness to Create a Healthy Half-Time Nosh

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

The game is on! According to some estimates, Super Bowl Sunday is the second-biggest eating day (after Thanksgiving) for Americans. That’s a LOT of wings, chips, guacamole, pizza, beer and brownies. But you don’t have to resign yourself to a day-long snacking binge—after all, we aren’t playing the game: we’re just sitting around watching it. Nevertheless, you can provide your guests with a tasty half-time spread that won’t require abandoning New Year’s resolutions or adding extra holes to belts. Maybe some of these recipe tweaks and tips for mindfully making your football party more healthy will work for your event.

Using Mindfulness to Create a Healthy Half-Time Nosh