Posts By: kbroihier

What are the Pros of Plant-Based Eating?

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Vegetarians come in all colors, shapes, sizes and approaches—some don’t even identify themselves using the word “vegetarian” at all. Vegans are a category of vegetarians who do not eat any animal products at all (not even eggs or dairy products), and a new trend among some in this group is to call their way of eating a “plant-based diet.” There is no strict definition of this term, however, and so it follows that anyone who eats some form of vegetarian diet might consider “plant-based eating” an apt description of their food intake patterns. Regardless of why someone chooses to shun animal products in favor of a plant-based diet, there do seem to be some significant benefits from this way of eating.

The Hub-bub About Heart Disease and Saturated Fat

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Here we go again, folks! It seems like science has shown us the error of our ways with regard to limiting saturated fat in order to decrease heart disease risk. After years of hearing about how bad saturated fat (the kind found in meat, cheese and butter) is for heart health, have scientists now learned it’s okay after all? The headlines and publicity last week from the international study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine might lead you to think so.

The Hub-bub About Heart Disease and Saturated Fat

Mythbusting: Raw Food is Healthier than Cooked Food

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

The raw food movement is a trend that dominates hip menus of many health-conscious restaurants. Books about it line bookshelves heavy with information about other fad diets, such as the Paleo diet and gluten-free diets for health instead of allergen sensitivity. What’s the idea behind it? And, more importantly, does it offer a legitimate opportunity to improve your health?

Mythbusting: Raw Food is Healthier than Cooked Food

Do Added Sugars Add Up To More Heart Disease?

by in Disease Prevention, Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

The story on sugar hasn’t been so sweet lately. About a week ago there was a flurry of publicity over a study published recently in the Journal of the American Medical Association that linked sugar to heart disease. Given that February is American Heart Month, now seems a good time to look at the connection between added sugars and heart disease. Let’s get past the news-hour sound bite, however, and examine what the report actually showed, and what it might mean for your diet and health.

Do Added Sugars Add Up To More Heart Disease?

Get Moving!

by in Fitness and Weight Loss, Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Let’s face it, many of us lead very sedentary lives. We sit to eat meals (at least, we ought to), we sit in our cars to get places, many of us sit at desks at work for much of the day, at home we sit to watch television or at our computers. Then we lie down and sleep. Research shows that even if you engage in regular exercise daily (say, 30 minutes of moderate walking), it might not be enough to counteract all that sitting—at least in regard to cardiovascular disease risk. But, there are other benefits of exercise, as we know, including helping with weight control, strengthening bones and muscles, and even boosting mood.

Get Moving!

Is Kombucha a Cure-all?

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

Kombucha is a fermented tea beverage that has its roots in ancient China. What once was a folksy 1970s home remedy gained “health food” status in the 1990s and is now available at specialty stores nationwide, via online retailers, at larger supermarkets and even at some convenience stores. This bubbly beverage has drawn a lot of health hype. Is its reputation justified?

Is Kombucha a Cure-all?

How Does Your Recipe Measure Up?

by in Nutrition Science

Kitty Broihier

You think you’re cooking healthy, but do you really know how your recipes stack up nutritionally? Find out how your tweaked recipe looks compared to the USDA’s MyPlate recommendations, and then make a few more modifications if you need to.

How Does Your Recipe Measure Up?